Posts Tagged ‘Domaine Georges Michel’

Wild Country New Zealand BBQ Leg of Lamb

April 13, 2009

Here is a fun recipe from  Wild Country New Zealand. They hand make a range of delicious gourmet condiments using many locally grown ingredients from the Waikato in New Zealand.

BBQ Leg of Lambuntitled-1

1.75 – 2kg leg of lamb carvery leg or boned.
¼ cup lemon juice
3 – 4 strips of lemon rind, chopped
½ cup Wild Country Garlic Infused Olive Oil
a handful of oregano leaves, washed, destalked and chopped
1 teaspoon of maldon sea salt
freshly ground pepper
1 cup white wine

Place lamb in a large non corrosive dish and pour lemon juice over, turning lamb to coat. Combine oil, oregano, salt and black pepper in a small bowl and mix well. Using a spoon or your hand rub the inside cavity of the lamb as well as the outside. Cover and refrigerate for 24 hours.

Transfer lamb to roasting pan, spoon over any herb mixture and juice left in dish, then add white wine. Truss the lamb with string to hold it into shape.
Place lamb on a rack in the roasting dish and then BBQ with the hood down for at least 30 minutes per 500g of meat.

If you don’t have a hooded bbq simply place meat on the grill and you may need to cover with a little tinfoil to hold the moisture in.
Remove lamb from roasting pan and rest in a warm place for 15 minutes before carving.

Wine Pairing

This dish is well suited for either a New Zealand pinot noir or if you are fortunate enough to find a well aged Bordeaux blend from Waiheke Island.

Wines to seek out Torlesse Wines, Bannock Brae Estate, Domaine Georges Michel or Peninsula Estate.

“Sommeliers report that diners are asking for something untried and untested.”

December 2, 2008

The most exceptional wines are crafted by artisan winemakers. A journey of exciting discovery awaits those who explore the world of New Zealand’s artisan winemakers!

It’s called the Golden Mile for a reason. Birthplace of Marlborough’s famed Sauvignon Blanc, this region consistently produces delightful wines with the fresh and lively fruit personality that so many of you request.

dgmskypic016postcardGeorges Michel and his family are exceptionally passionate about the Golden Mile of New Zealand. For 10 years they’ve dedicated themselves to developing the 84 acres and have completely retrofitted the estate winery. Rows of French oak barrels, new tanks, winemaking daughter Swan and French viticulturalist Daniel LeBrun are all part of the modernized Domaine. 

The Michels’ dedication shows in their superb bottlings of Pinot Noir, Chardonnay and Sauvignon Blanc. Mouth-filling and beautifully balanced. Luscious fruit and gentle waves that build and linger. Just like Georges Michel himself, these wines show bright New Zealand spirit with a touch of European elegance. 

dgm-cream-marlborough-labelAt last a refined Sauvignon Blanc from New Zealand! It offers the zingy citrus and herbaceous flavors that make this varietal so refreshing. This one is for those special evenings with friends when the magic of food and wine come together It has the elegance and depth of a classic Sauvignon Blanc, the kind of wine that fits in beautifully at the dinner table.

A slow fermentation brings out lustrous tropical fruit notes. The owner’s daughter, winemaker Swan Michel, adds smoothness to the blend with a deft touch of Semillon. This wine is a delicious and rare fusion of New World vitality and Old World grace!

This is a wine that is worth the effort to find. Let the Christmas treasure hunt begin. 

Headline quote from Wine & Spirits Magazine, 19th Annual Exclusive Restaurant Poll, April 2008

Finding New Wines

August 26, 2008

As consumers of wine we have no shortage of choices. Decision’s can be challenging, whether we are in the New Zealand, California or French wine sections, our options might include:

  1. Subscribe to the major publications and go shopping with their recommendations
  2. Get to know and trust a retailer or sommelier and follow their lead
  3. Close your eyes and grab

Which method is best is really determined by what we want our wine experiences to be. If we just want something to drink then it probably does not matter what the selection process is. For others the reviews in the big publications will be useful . And for others it will involve a sense places and people.

Here are some ideas for those who want a connection to people and places. If you are of a certain age you will have memories of shopping for records. Albums had creative cover art and detailed liner notes on the back. Because of the physical size of a record album it was possible to have lots of information about the people, recording location and this all became part of the buying process.

As we flipped thru albums and read notes we often learned about guest musicians who sat in for a song or two. Sometimes these were well known musicians or unknown players. Their appearances introduced them as musicians who had something to offer. As we flipped thru and read the notes we would see patterns repeat themselves, session players showing up in different places or even having their own albums. Buying these newly discovered musicians would lead us to new places and created new listening opportunities. It was usually a success and the pattern repeated. More liner notes and more new discoveries.

So it is with wine too.

If you have visited Marlborough New Zealand you may have visited and tasted wines from Domaine Georges Michel. As you read the liner notes you learn Georges is French and had the good fortune to have his New Zealand wine project guided by Guy Brac de la Perriere, a man from one of France’s oldest wine making dynasties. Locally, New Zealander Peter Saunders  was the assistant wine maker working and learning from Georges and Guy. Today, Peter produces his own wine in Waipara.

The patterns continue today with Georges daughter Swan providing the winemaking leadership.  Swan has benefited from working not only with Guy but also with winemakers Patrick Valette in Bordeaux and in Burgundy with Clos des Lambray

Do you see these patterns creating choices for finding new wines? The patterns go both ways and include people and regions.

Or, maybe you visit the Central Coast region in California and you notice Bob Lindquist and Jim Clendenen have family members with their own labels. Verdad and Cold Heaven Cellars. Should be fun and worth finding.

These patterns are everywhere and I believe a great way to find new wines. This path may or may not go thru the big publications or even the better retailers and sommeliers. For some this will make the path more interesting as it is self directed.

To find new wines this way we need to take the time to find out something about the people behind the wine. It circles back to the earlier questions about who grew the grapes, who made the wine and what do you know about them? Good questions guiding us in the treasure hunt for new wines.